Arts, Main, Music, z22
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The Big Money in Hallelujah


Photo: DrOjOhn/Flickr/Creative Commons

Photo: DrOjOhn/Flickr/Creative Commons

“Let me hear a hallelujah. Can I get an amen?”

Those are popular words with some people right now. I’m no music critic, but I keep hearing a country song on the radio “My Church” with those words. The song is a huge hit and it has a powerful lesson.

When I first noticed this song on the radio, I thought I was hearing a gospel song, and I liked it, without knowing the words. Who listens to lyrics on the radio? I liked it enough to learn more, and it really is a song about not going to church.

A young woman,  Maren Morris, finds freedom from her sins and spiritual revival by driving her old car on back roads, and listening to country songs on the radio. Back road therapy is a big thing in country music.

So it’s a feel-good popular song that is slightly offensive to Christians. That makes it like most songs on the radio. In seventies talk, the powerful lesson is in the vibes and the ripoff, which is feelings and borrowed ideas. So that are the vibes and what got ripped off?

Christians worshiping Jesus.

The song sounds like a lively service in a small church, but that’s only borrowed. It’s just popular music.

A few years ago I took guitar lessons and I remember my teacher talking about musical things. He had no religion that I could detect, but he got emotional when he talked about the hymn Amazing Grace. That borderline atheist loved the song, and he was moved by the concept of God’s grace for sinners. I am not making this up. He volunteered the information.

I now believe that the whole world is like my teacher. One of the most powerful sounds in the world is Christians sincerely worshiping Jesus, and people love to hear it.

I was once at a sad funeral with many Cree natives, from a reserve. When they sang their Christian songs, their way, the sensation could almost make the hair stand up on the back of your neck. Those humble Christians were real.

I have also heard Christians from Russia, and Korea, and Africa, and Scotland, and a rescue mission for homeless people in Canada where one guy at the front banged out chords on an old guitar. Sincere Christian worship always has a power that I can’t explain.

Jesus could explain it though;

The large crowd of his disciples began to thank God and praise him in loud voices for all the great things that they had seen: “God bless the king who comes in the name of the Lord! Peace in heaven and glory to God!” Then some of the Pharisees in the crowd spoke to Jesus. “Teacher,” they said, “command your disciples to be quiet!” Jesus answered, “I tell you that if they keep quiet, the stones themselves will start shouting.” (Luke 19:37 to 40)

Back to the country song; Maren Morris and her team know that people love the sound of Christian worship, and they are building careers and fortunes on that knowledge. They are not the first; did you know Elvis was raised as a Pentecostal, and the Beatles imitated Christian revival sounds in their songs, with words about Mother Mary and Krishna? And Michael Jackson and Prince were raised as Jehovah’s Witnesses?

The power is free for anyone who wants to use it, but it really belongs to sincere Christians. If we keep quiet, secular musicians will start shouting.

Day after day and night after night they keep on saying, “Holy, holy, holy is the Lord God, the Almighty, the one who always was, who is, and who is still to come.” Whenever the living beings give glory and honor and thanks to the one sitting on the throne (the one who lives forever and ever), the twenty-four elders fall down and worship the one sitting on the throne. (Revelations 4: 8 to 10)

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