All posts filed under: Archaeology

Jerusalem’s Pilgrim road was built by Pilate, and it was a sign of things to come

Archaeologists have determined that a road thought to have been originally constructed by King Herod Agrippa (41 AD to 44 AD) was actually built by Pontius Pilate who was governor of Judea from 26 AD to at least 37 AD. Agrippa was the grandson of King Herod who ruled at the time of Christ’s birth. Known as the Jerusalem Pilgrim Road, it is a popular tourist site for both Jews and Christians. The stepped road, that was over a third of a mile long (600 meters), started at the Pool of Siloam (a mikveh or ritual bath) near the southern gates of the city and travelled up to the Jewish temple. And we see a reference to the upward incline in Acts 3:1, when we are told that Peter and John were going “up” to the Temple. Jews used this road for pilgrimages to the Temple during three of the feasts, Passover, Pentecost and the Feast of Tabernacles. Josephus estimated that upwards of two million would visit Jerusalem during those festivals. Jewish pilgrims started their …

Evidence that the Jewish Temple existed on the Temple Mount

In recent decades, there have been several making the outrageous claim that the Jews have no right to the Temple Mount in Jerusalem, because the Jews never had a Temple. In addition to several Muslim scholars, you also have atheists and those with a left-wing political agenda making this and similar claims. In an article entitled, Mistrust Threatens Delicate Balance at a Sacred Site in Jerusalem, the New York Times describes the growing controversy on the Temple’s existence noting: “Temple denial, increasingly common among Palestinian leaders, also has a long history: After Israel became a state in 1948, the Waqf removed from its guidebooks all references to King Solomon’s Temple, whose location at the site it had previously said was “beyond dispute.”” Of course, the Bible clearly states that the Jews actually built two Temples on Mount Zion, including the first Temple built by King Solomon, destroyed in 587 BC, and a second Temple built by Ezra that later underwent major renovations by King Herod. That Temple was destroyed by the Romans in 70 AD. …

First example of the ancient ‘Royal Purple’ found in Israel

According to report in the Daily Mail, archaeologists working in the Timma Valley in Southern Israel have discovered the remains of a fabric that was coloured in royal purple. This was the first time an example of this expensive and rare colouring has been discovered. It was apparently preserved because of the area’s dry climate. This ancient purple was reknown for its ability to hold its colour for long period of times. According to radio carbon testing the fabric was 3,000 years old. Purple was extremely rare because it was produced in small amounts from a gland inside the mollusks found in the Mediterranean Sea. Each gland produced the equivalent of a single drop of the dye and according to reports it took about four million mollusks to produce a pound of dye. At times, the purple dye was so expensive, it cost more than gold. As a result of its rarity and expense, the colour quickly became associated with royalty in Biblical times. Speaking for the Israel Antiquities Authority, Naama Sukenik stated: ‘This is …

The Discovery of an ancient description, ‘Christ, born of Mary,’ hints to an earlier battle with heresy

Israeli archaeologists working in the Jezreel Valley recently announced that they found an ancient description of Jesus dated to the fifth century. It was found in the remains of a Byzantine Church located near the village of et-Taiyiba. Curiously, the phrase, “Christ, born of Mary,” may hint of a great theological battle that raged in the early church a couple of centuries earlier. The Greek inscription, that was carved on stone and appeared on top of the entrance, reads in full: “Christ, born of Mary. This work of the most God-fearing and pious bishop [Theodo]sius and the miserable Th[omas] was built from the foundation… Whoever enters should pray for them.” According to Dr. Leah Di-Segni who works at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem the phrase “Christ, born of Mary” was used by the people to ward off curses associated with an evil eye. As part of this, people often included this phrase in letters they were sending to friends. One of the persons mentioned in the greeting was Theodosius, the archbishop for the area around …

Have archaeologists discovered the dance floor on which John the Baptist was condemned to death?

According to a report on Live Science, archaeologists claimed to have found the very dance floor on which John the Baptist was condemned to death. In the Gospels, we are told the story behind John the Baptist’s execution at the hands of Herod of Antipas. The prophet had been actively condemning the marriage of Herod Antipas to a woman named Herodias. She was the wife of Herod’s half-brother Philip, who Herod actually stole while visiting Philip. Though the Romans were known for their notoriously low moral standards, even they were disgusted by Herod’s actions. Because of John’s constant condemnation of the marriage, Herod finally had John arrested. “But Herod the tetrarch, being rebuked by him about Herodias, his brother’s wife, and about all the evil things Herod had done, added this to everything else—he locked John up in prison,” (Luke 3:19-20). It was apparent by this action, that the Baptist’s words were having an impact on people’s opinion of this marriage, and Herod wanted John stopped. But Herod was hesitant about having John executed, because …

House church found in Laodicean home may explain Revelation 3:15-17

Archaeologists working in the ancient city of Laodicea recently discovered a home in the ruins of the city dated to the first century that also contained a church. This has left some wondering if the Apostle John was addressing the believers who attended this church in his message to the seven churches of Asia found in the first three chapters of Revelation. Laodicea, located in modern Turkey, was the second largest city in Asia during the Roman period second only to Ephesus. It was a very wealthy city as it was part of a major trade route that included Ephesus and Smyrna. In addition, the city was also known for its banking and textile manufacturing. The home was quite large, 2,000 square meters in size, and was located beside a large theatre. The house had 20 rooms, that included the church, baths, a large hall with 18 columns and as well an area from which its owner, who was apparently quite wealthy, operated a business. Though the home was built in the first century, it …

Does a ritual bath confirm the location of the Garden of Gethsemane?

Oddly, the discovery of a ritual bath, also known as a mikveh, at the Church of Gethsemane (officially called The Church of All Nations and the Basilica of the Agony) may confirm that this is the site of the Garden of Gethsemane that was visited often by Jesus and His disciples The church and associated garden, located outside the walls of Old Jerusalem, is one of the most famous pilgrimage sites in Israel and is typically visited by millions each year. The word Gethsemane means oil press and its location at the base of the Mt of Olives makes sense as the ancient Jews built their oil presses near where the olives were grown to limit handling and transportation. Both Mark (Mark 14:32-42) and Mathew (Matthew 26:36-56) referred to it as Garden of Gethsemane which would suggest the garden contained an oil press. Speaking for the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA), archaeologist Amit Re’em explains: “Two thousand years ago, it was a field outside the walls of Jerusalem, full [of] olive trees and in the middle of …

Archaeological find in the Czech Republic reminds us of the true meaning of Christmas

A recent announcement of an archaeological discovery in the Czech Republic reminds us of the true meaning of Christmas. According to an article in the Daily Mail, archaeologists have been working for several months at the Milevsko Monastery that was constructed in 1187. They recently discovered a previously unknown secret chamber that was part of a narrow passageway beneath the monastery. Inside the secret room, archaeologists found a box with a gold cross on top made of 21-karat gold. The box also had the letters IR on it that traditionally meant “Jesus is King.” The box contained a 6-inch nail that was reportedly from the cross used to crucify Jesus Christ. Relics were a dime a dozen in the Middle Ages, so it is unlikely this is from Christ’s cross. However, a study of the wood used to build the box indicated it may have been constructed between 260 AD and 416 AD, possibly making the nail among the earliest of these type of relics. Archaeologists also discovered other “priceless” Christian relics inside the chamber …

Seven modern misconceptions about the original Christmas story

When we listen to Christmas carols and read our Christmas cards we sometime get the wrong impression about what really took place on the day Jesus was born. The following are seven modern misconceptions about the events surrounding the birth of Christ. None of these take away from the miracle that took place that day. 1. Jesus was not born on December 25th Look there is nothing wrong with celebrating the birth of Christ on December 25. As we read the Biblical account, the Lord’s birth was obviously a significant event and was very much celebrated. But it did not take place on December 25th. The fact that shepherds were in their fields when Jesus was born, suggests that Christ was probably born during spring lambing. So how did we end up with Dec. 25? Well, that was the result of the compounding of an earlier mistake. One of the first festivals initiated by the Roman Catholic Church was the Assumption of Mary, that celebrated her conception by the Holy Spirit. They set that date …

Did Balaam prophesy about the Star of Bethlehem?

Balaam was an interesting Old Testament character. He was some type of diviner, perhaps soothsayer or sorcerer, whom King Balak of Moab hired to curse Israel before an upcoming battle. During the several prophecies that Balaam delivered, there was one that many believe referred to the star that showed up announcing Christ’s birth. Now obviously Balaam had a reputation as a seer, for Balak to be willing to purchase his services. And Balaam’s international fame was confirmed by Dutch archaeologists who found a text written about Balaam on a plastered wall dated to around 1200 BC in the ancient town of Deir Alla located in Jordan. The text was actually written by the Canaanites and spoke Balaam, son of Beor three times in the first four lines, exactly as the Bible describes him (Numbers 22:5). In this inscription, Balaam is referred to as a seer of the gods indicating he was well known and revered among the gentiles. The text also provides several of Balaam’s curses that suggests this was his specialty and apparently, these …

Archaeological evidence of Nehemiah and Ezra’s return to Jerusalem

After the Babylonian King Nebuchadnezzar sacked Jerusalem, destroyed the Jewish Temple and hauled off tens of thousands of Jews into captivity, the Jews were allowed to return to Judah after the Persians conquered Babylon. The Persian king, Artaxerxes, gave Nehemiah permission to return and rebuild the city of Jerusalem that lay in ruins. It seems that Nehemiah was essentially building what would serve as an outpost and provincial administrative center for the Persian empire, which explains why the Persian King provided material assistance for the rebuilding (Nehemiah 2:1-20). Over 42,000 Jews initially returned to Jerusalem for this rebuilding (Nehemiah 7:66). However, if this was an administrative center for the Persian Empire, one thing that puzzled archaeologists was the lack of Persian artifacts in Jerusalem from this period. But according to the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) that all changed over the summer when archaeologists found evidence of two Persian royal seals from this period in a dig in Old Jerusalem. Seals were used to authenticate documents and goods. It involved an instrument on which the seal …

Has Jesus’ childhood home in Nazareth been discovered?

Some are suggesting that an ancient stone house located beneath the Sisters of Nazareth Convent in Nazareth may actually be the house that Jesus grew up in. In his book, The Sisters of Nazareth Convent: A Roman-period, Byzantine and Crusader site in central Nazareth, Professor Ken Dark, an archaeologist at the University of Reading, states that there is evidence that the home partially carved into the side of a limestone hill was constructed in the first century or earlier and was revered by early believers. A group of archaeologists had been working at the site since 2006. The property was donated to the Sister of Nazareth Convent in the 19th century, and led to the construction of their convent. But prior to this, the archaeologists discovered that previous churches had been built at the site. A Byzantine cave church had been built into the hill beside the first-century house in the fourth century. The larger cave church had mosaics and a large marble screen common to Byzantine churches of the day. There is also evidence …

A just weight for all

As Israel was being set up in the Promised Land, God gave the nation a stern warning against corruption and the need for honest weights and measures. 14 You shall not have in your house differing measures, a large and a small. 15 You shall have a full and just weight; you shall have a full and just measure, that your days may be prolonged in the land which the Lord your God gives you. (Deuteronomy 25:14-15 NASV) Weights were used to measure goods being presented for taxes and temple sacrifices and as well in the trade of goods. But notice how God warned about having two weights, a large and small weight. One of them was undoubtedly the correct weight and the second a slightly smaller false weight, as the verse calls for a full and just weight. So, it would seem that a just weight was used for some people and an unjust weight for others. Now the difference in these two weights would not be huge. It had to be small enough so people …

More evidence of the Bible’s accuracy: What the discovery of three capitals tell us?

The discovery of three intricately carved capitals have been called a “once in a lifetime discovery” by archaeologists who found them recently during an archaeological dig in Old Jerusalem. The capitals were installed on top of columns and used to hold up roofs. Since, these three are not particularly large, it suggests that they weren’t intended for a roof of a building but perhaps a smaller covering in a courtyard. They also discovered a toilet at the site and since these were only used by the rich, it suggests that the building was owned by a rich, probably politically connected family. The three intricately decorated capitals were carved on both sides with symbols associated with King David’s dynasty and particularly the first Temple constructed by King David’s son, Solomon. According to the archaeologists this decoration style was reserved for either palaces or important government buildings. Based on other dateable items at the site, archaeologists believe the 2,700-year-old capitals are connected to the reign of King Hezekiah and/or his son Manasseh. However, the building was located …

Did archaeology discover a reference to Cush, the son of Ham?

The recent sale of an ancient small clay tablet by a Norwegian collector confirms the Biblical record that Ham, one of the sons of Noah, had a son named Cush. The table discovered in the ancient city of Sumeria dates to 3000 BC sold for $235,000 at auction. The seven-centimetre square tablet not only talks about beer making, but has on its top left-hand corner what many believe is the oldest reference to a person’s name — Kushim. Some have even referred to it as the first signature ever discovered. The person’s name has been found on other tablets where he is referred to as a temple administrator. Many believe there is a connection between this name and the Biblical reference to Cush, that was the name given the oldest son of Ham, one of Noah’s three sons who survived the flood (Genesis 10:6). We are told that Cush moved onto the plains of Shinar (Genesis 11:2) that can also be translated Shumer, which is the location of what today is referred to as the …

Archaeological evidence confirms that Sodom and Gomorrah were destroyed by intense fire

According to archaeologists working on the site believed to include the ancient cities of Sodom and Gomorrah, they found evidence confirming the Biblical record that the two cities were destroyed by sulphur and fire: 23 The sun had risen on the earth when Lot came to Zoar. 24 Then the Lord rained on Sodom and Gomorrah sulfur and fire from the Lord out of heaven. 25 And he overthrew those cities, and all the valley, and all the inhabitants of the cities, and what grew on the ground. Genesis 19: 23-25 NASV The archaeologists, who have been working on the site for 13 years, reported discovering evidence of intense heat. This included clay and rock that had been turned into glass. This would require a brief burst of heat of between 8,000 to 12,000 degree Celsius. The archaeologists also noted that the destruction took place “in an instant,” and resulted in the stripping of the topsoil. The archaeologists added that “a super-heated brine of Dead Sea anhydride salts pushed over the landscaped by the Event’s frontal shock wave.” It is interesting that even the Biblical …

Archaeological evidence discovered of the reigns of Hezekiah and Manasseh

An archaeological discovery beside the American embassy in Jerusalem has uncovered evidence of the Hezekiah/Manasseh reigns in Judah, that took place about 2,700 years ago. King Hezekiah was one of Judah’s better kings, and his son Manasseh was arguably the worst. At the site, archaeologists with the Israel Antiquities Authority discovered a large stone building that probably served as a tax collection centre. A large structure was needed as people often paid their taxes with produce and goods. Along with this, they found the handles of 120 jars used for storage, with many of them stamped with seals indicating ownership. The most common inscription was the phrase “belonging to the King” that was indicated by the letters ‘LMLK,’ along with a name of a major city probably indicating its origin. Other handles had the names of senior bureaucrats, whose name have been found at other sites, indicating their importance. But archaeologists also uncovered items that may reflect the reign of Hezekiah’s son, Manasseh. This included several small decorative items that were used in pagan worship …

Does the discovery of Naboth’s vineyard have a message for today?

Archaeologists working at the site of the ancient city of Jezreel in Israel are wondering if they have found the remains of a vineyard connected with Israel’s most wicked Queen, Jezebel. For those not familiar with Jezebel, she was the daughter of the King of Phoenicia who married King Ahab, probably as part of a peace treaty between the two nations. In the process, Jezebel gained control of both Ahab and the nation of Israel leading it down a path of sin and destruction. According to the Biblical account, King Ahab noticed a vineyard near his house in Jezreel owned by a man named Naboth. Ahab offered Naboth a deal he couldn’t refuse. However, Naboth refused stating that this land was part of God’s inheritance given to his family. King Ahab returned to his house and sulked, which is where Jezebel found her husband (1 Kings 21:1-4). When Ahab told his wife what had happened, Jezebel took matters into her own hands, and she seized the vineyard. We will discuss this in more detail later. …

Archaeological discovery reveals ‘when’ the Apostle Paul visited Corinth

It was an incredible archaeological find in 1905 and because of it, we know that the Apostle Paul arrived in the city of Corinth some time between May 1st, 51 AD and April 30, 52 AD and he stayed in the city for about a year and a half. In Acts 18:12-17, Luke describes Paul’s visit to Corinth and his encounter with several Jews who were outraged by Paul’s arrival. Luke writes that the Jewish leaders dragged Paul before Gallio who Luke describes as the proconsul of Achaia, covering a region that included Corinth, Delphi and Athens. The Jewish leaders accused Paul of “enticing people to worship God contrary to the law.” Luke writes that this case actually annoyed Gallio who told the Jews that his job was to adjudicate matters of crime, and he was not interested in settling disputes of theology and names (obviously a reference to Paul’s claim that Jesus was the Jewish Messiah). But when Paul was about to open his mouth, Gallio said to the Jews, “If it were a …

A study of names confirms Jeremiah

A study of names has confirmed the historicity of the Book of Jeremiah. The Book of Jeremiah was written 2,600 years ago between 628 BC to 586 BC (the year, Babylon sacked Jerusalem). Through a series of prophecies, Jeremiah repeatedly warned Judah that God was sending Babylon to judge the nation and haul the Jews into captivity. He also prophesied that the Jews would be restored to the promised land in 70 years and Babylon destroyed (Jeremiah 25:11-12). Skeptics typically dispute the book, because basically they don’t believe in prophecy and therefore conclude Jeremiah must have been written well after the incidents recorded in the Biblical book. However, according to an article in Biblical Archaeological Review, Hebrew University’s Mitka Golub says a study of names cited in the Book of Jeremiah proves it was written at the time the incidents took place. Like today, Golub says that names are a reflection of their time. There were popular styles of Hebrew names that were in vogue at certain times and not as much in other periods. …

Seal found confirming the existence of King Jeroboam II

Archaeology keeps confirming the Biblical record by not only finding evidence of the good guys, but the bad ones as well. In 1904, archaeologists discovered a seal of Jeroboam II at an archaeological dig in Megiddo located in Northern Israel. Jeroboam II ruled Israel for about 41 years between 786 BC and 746 BC. He was the 13th King of Israel after the nation split apart into the Northern Kingdom, Israel and the Southern Kingdom, Judah. Jeroboam II should not to be confused with Jeroboam, who was Israel’s first king after the separation. The small seal actually did not belong to Jeroboam but rather a man named Shema. The seal reads: “Belonging to Shema, the servant of Jeroboam.” Only the important or the wealthy had seals, and Shema’s description as “servant of Jeroboam” indicated he was a very senior bureaucrat at Jeroboam’s palace in Samaria. Throughout the Bible, the Hebrew word “ebed,” translated “servant” on the seal, was used to describe important government officials as we see it used in 2 Kings 22:12. The description …

Discoveries at the Tel of Dan confirm the Biblical record

The Tel of Dan is considered one of the great Bible archaeological finds in recent years. Located in Northern Israel, near the borders of Lebanon and Syria, the site has been conclusively proven to be the city of Dan, that represented the main city for the Tribe of Dan, one of the 12 sons of Israel. Before the city was taken over by the Tribe of Dan, it went by the name of Laish (Judges 18:7). When the Tribe of Dan claimed the area, the city was attacked, the inhabitants driven out, and the city was rebuilt and it became synonymous with the tribe. However, through most of its existence, the Tribe of Dan struggled with idolatry and when Israel and Judah were divided into two kingdoms, Jeroboam, the first King of Israel, set up golden idols at both Bethel and Dan (2 Kings 10:29). This was done in an effort to break the ties of the Jews living in Israel to Jerusalem and the Jewish temple. But the excavations at the city of Dan, …

Have archaeologists discovered the horns once attached to the Jewish altar at Shiloh?

The discovery last year made the list of the top ten Bible archaeology discoveries of 2019 for several organizations. Three items thought to be the horns off the altar were found by archaeologists with the Texas-based Associates for Biblical Research (ABR) working at a site in Samaria believed to be the location of Shiloh, where the Tabernacle of Moses once stood (Joshua 18:1). During the construction of the altar, the Israeli were specifically told to make horns and attach them to corners of the altar (Exodus 27:2). It is believed the three stone horns discovered by ABR were carved for this purpose. The largest horn was 9.25 inches (ca. 23 cm) x 15 inches (ca. 38 cm). The altar stood at the front of the Tabernacle of Moses. Animals were sacrificed in front of the altar and the blood poured out before the altar and then smeared on the horns (Exodus 29:11-12). The animals were then burnt on top of the altar. The horns played a significant role both theologically and prophetically in Israel’s religious …

Model of Herod's Temple at the Israel Museum. Photo: Berthold Werner/Wikipedia

Has the third Jewish temple already been constructed?

In early September, Dr. Ghassan Weshah, an archaeological professor from the Islamic University of Gaza in Palestine told the media that the Biblical references to the Jewish Temple existing on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem are all a complete lie. He made these claims despite the fact the Muslim Koran refers to the temple at least twice, and even refers to King Solomon building the temple (34:13). Another Koranic verse describes the Muslims praying towards Mecca and the Jews towards their temple (Sura 2:145). However, a handful of Islamic scholars try to get around this problem by insisting that Solomon actually built a mosque, even though Islam did not appear on the scene until 1,600 years later. According to the Biblical record, Solomon built the first temple around 1000 BC and it was destroyed in 586 BC by the Babylonians who them promptly hauled thousands of Jews into captivity. Ezra constructed what is called the second Temple around 520 BC when the Persians who had defeated the Babylonians allowed the Jews to return to Jerusalem. …

The discovery of the oldest mention of the ‘Hebrews’ outside the Bible hints of spiritual warfare

Archaeologists working at Atarot, located in Jordan, recently uncovered a large cylinder shaped altar dated to the 9/8 the century BC. It was created by an ancient king of Moab, one of the dreaded enemies of Israel mentioned several times in the Old Testament. Archaeologists believe the altar, found inside an ancient shrine, was used for burning incense. But as they deciphered the seven lines of script written on the altar, they discovered the oldest reference to the “Hebrews” outside the Bible. The inscription is linked to a Biblical battle mentioned in 2 Kings 3. According to the Biblical record, Israel had conquered Moab and were forcing the country to pay an annual tribute to Israel. However, when the Israeli King died (Ahab), the Moabite King decided to take advantage of the political instability to break free from Israel’s control by refusing to make the annual payment. When that happened, the new Israeli King, Jehoram, contacted Judah’s King Jehoshaphat and an unnamed King of Edom to bring Moab to heel. If the King of Moab …

24 | The mysterious disappearance of the Ark of the Covenant

Follow our podcasts on: Itunes Stitcher Spotify Google Play IHeartRadio TuneIn Podchaser PODCAST NOTES: I made an unusual purchase the other day. I bought the Ark of the Covenant. Hi my name is Dean Smith and in this podcast I want to talk about the mysterious disappearance of the Ark of the Covenant and the ancient conspiracy theories that swirled around at the time because of its disappearance. The Ark was a gold-plated box with two winged cherubim that sat inside the Tabernacle of Moses, the Tabernacle of David and lastly the Temple in Jerusalem. Between the two Cherubim rested the very presence of God and because of this, the Ark is referred to as God’s throne on earth. Of course, what I bought was a miniature replica about 4” x 2.5” in size proportional to the original which was 4’ by 2.5’. But the similarity stops there, because I am pretty sure for $21.77 Canadian, my replica is not gold-plated like the original, but other than that it looks kind of neat. The top …

Evidence of the Babylonian siege of Jerusalem reopens an ancient mystery

Archaeologists working on the site of the Temple Mount in Old Jerusalem discovered evidence of the Babylonian conquest of Jerusalem in 587/586 BC when both the city and the Temple were basically destroyed. The siege recorded in several books of Bible tells how King Nebuchadnezzar also took tens of thousands of Jews into captivity. According to the team, made up of archaeologists from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte (UNC) and Israel’s Haifa University, they discovered several evidences of the attack including a layer of ash indicating a massive burning and more importantly Scythian arrowheads that were used by Babylonian soldiers. Since the Babylonian arrowheads were mixed in with the ash it is strong evidence the burning was associated with Babylon’s attack on Jerusalem. They also found evidence of houses being left in shambles which again would be expected after the city was taken. In an interview with the Jerusalem Post, UNC professor Shimon Gibson stated: “They (Scythian arrowheads) were fairly commonplace in this period and are known to be used by the Babylonian …

Apostle Peter’s house in Bethaisda discovered?

Archaeologists working with Nyack College’s Center for the Study of Ancient Judaism and Christianity and Israel’s Kinnert College recently announced they had discovered what was thought to be the Apostle Peter’s home in Bethsaida. What the archaeologists actually discovered was the remains of an ancient Byzantium church that they believe was originally built over top of the birth home of Peter and Andrew, disciples of Christ. Though Peter eventually moved to nearby Capernaum, the Gospel of John reports that he his brother were originally from Bethsaida: 44 Now Philip was from Bethsaida, of the city of Andrew and Peter. (John 1:44 NASV) The archaeological team led by Mordechai Aviam is referring to the Church of the Apostle referenced by a man named Willibald in 725 AD. He was the Bishop of Eichstaett located in Bavaria. During a pilgrimage to Jerusalem he wrote of visiting the Church of the Apostle in Bethsaida while sailing from Capernaum to Kuris on the Sea of Galilee. He noted specifically the church was built over the original home of Peter and …

Bulla mentioning ancient Bethlehem found

In 2012, archaeologists working with the Israel Antiquities Authority made a remarkable discovery in old Jerusalem. They found a bulla that mentioned the name of Bethlehem (House of Bread). This is the first mention of the famous town found outside the Biblical record. Bullas worked much like our signatures do today and were used to verify documents. Governmental and wealthy people used bullas to seal documents to verify that it was coming from them. They typically wore signet rings that pressed their confirming insignia into wax or clay, sealing the document. The Bulla in this instance was estimated to be 2,700 years old placing it from the first Temple period (1000 BC to 586 BC) referring to the first temple built by King Solomon. The Second Temple period refers to the temple rebuilt by Ezra and Nehemiah (upgraded by King Herod) and destroyed in 70 AD by the Romans. In this instance, the bulla was used to verify the shipment of taxes collected in Bethlehem being sent to Jerusalem. Referred to as a fiscal bulla, …

Has an altar of Melchizedek, the man of mystery, been discovered in Jerusalem?

El Shukron is an archaeologist working with Israel Antiquities Authority and over the years he has made some significant discoveries. Working with fellow archaeologist Ronny Reich, the two discovered the pool of Siloam in 2004 that is mentioned in the New Testament as the spot where Christ healed a blind man (John 9:11). He has also had a hand in discovering the Jerusalem Pilgrim Road and a bulla that referenced Bethlehem which at the time of its discovery in 2012 was the only mention of Bethlehem found outside the Bible. But recently in an interview with CBN, Shukron shared what he considered to be his greatest discovery found while working in the old Jerusalem that includes the Temple Mount. Shukron found a stone pillar that he believes was part of an altar used by Melchizedek. It included a channel used to funnel off the blood during sacrifices. He believes it was similar to the altar that Jacob set up after having a dream where he saw angels descending and ascending to heaven on a ladder. …

King David moving the Ark of the Covenant from Gibeon to the Tabernacle of David in Jerusalem. Painter unknown

Discovery of Ziklag confirms Biblical record

According to Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA), archaeologists have uncovered the small, yet significant town of Ziklag that was located near ancient Judah’s southern border with the Philistines. Archaeologists working at the site are 90% certain that they have found the remains of the ancient town. They discovered evidence that both Israelis and Philistines inhabited the site which confirms the Biblical record. These included the distinctive idols, lamps and pottery similar to finds in other known Philistine cities. They also discovered nearly 100 complete pots with a design associated with Israel during King David’s reign. The were used to hold oil or wine and in at least one instance beer. Though mentioned several times in the Bible, Ziklag was a small rural town and archaeologists said it measured about 1,000 square meters (10,764 sq ft) in size. Some believe the name Ziklag could be loosely translated as liquid metal and may be a reference to smelting. When Israel entered the Promised Land under Joshua, the city was given to the tribe of Simeon (Joshua 19:1-5). However, …

Maybe it’s more than a coincidence? Israeli paratroopers discover ancient watchtower

It was more than a bit ironic when soldiers with the Israeli Defense Force (IDF) discovered an ancient watchtower associated with the days of King Hezekiah during the 8th century BCE. The IDF paratroopers had set up a base on a hilltop in Southern Israel when they accidentally discovered the tower. After making the discovery, the soldiers actually participated in the dig. The remains of the tower were about 6 feet (1.83 m) in height and archaeologists estimate that it was originally 15 feet (4.57 m) high with a diameter of 10.5 feet (3.2 m). This was a significant structure as the foundation stones weighed about 8 tons. According to the archaeologists this tower, built on top of a hill, would have provided ancient Israeli military commanders an excellent view on activities taking place in the Philistine nation, particularly one of its major cities Ashkelon. Israel built a series of towers and fortresses along the border that were within view of each other, so it would allow a tower to send up a warning using …

Wall discovered at Lachish confirms 2 Chronicles 11:5-11

The remains of Lachish an ancient Jewish city is  a two-day walk from Jerusalem. Recent discovering at the city have caused major problems for secularist because it is not going along with their preconceived ideas. Secularists basically don’t believe the Bible is true treating it as little more than a collection of myths. It is taken awhile but most secularists finally acknowledged that King David and King Solomon did exist, which is a big step forward because for years they didn’t even believe that. But after repeated archaeological discoveries proved them wrong, they have finally allowed the facts to speak for themselves. So they changed their tune slightly and decided the two existed, but were little more than small village warlords and not the leaders of a formidable kingdom portrayed in the Bible. But a recent discovery at Lachish is putting that notion of a tribal war lord to route. According the Biblical record, Lachish was a major fortified city in Israel during the reign of King Rehoboam. Rehoboam was Solomon’s son (grandson of King …

Catholic relics of Christ’s crucifixion saved from Notre Dame fire

The world was captivated by the burning of Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris yesterday, April 15, 2019.  It is unquestionably one of the world’s most famous Christian landmarks and it was not lost on many that it burned during the start of the Roman Catholic Holy week leading up to Easter. It is now believed that the fire was accidental, caused by the extensive renovations taking place in the Cathedral. But there was room for doubt because there have been dozens of attacks on churches in France in recent months including the setting of fires. In mid-March, 2019, a fire was purposely set at the Saint-Sulpice church shortly after morning mass. It is one of the largest churches in Paris, and the fire caused damage estimated at several million Euros. RELATED: Twelve French Churches Attacked, Vandalized in One Week: Breitbart Last year, nearly 875 churches were vandalized and it is continuing unabated in 2019. Perhaps the most vile, was the smearing of a cross made of excrement inside Saint-Alain Cathedral in Nimes on February 6th, …