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Did a “God is not Dead” sequel just play at the University of Connecticut?


[Language warning on the Video] I recently went with my daughter to watch the movie “God is not Dead.” Even aside from the message, I enjoyed it as a movie  and would recommend people watch it.

Now I wonder if a sequel of that movie recently played out at the University of Connecticut.

In “God is not Dead,” a university professor — played by Kevin Sorbo — requires students in his philosophy class to sign a statement that “God is Dead” to pass a section of their class. The students are essentially bullied into signing the declaration.

However, when Josh Wheaten (Shane Harper) decides to stand up for his faith, instead of failing him in this section, the professor offers Josh a compromise — he can defend his faith in front of the class. The students would decide if Josh passed or failed.

It turns into a debate on the existence of God. In one of his presentations, Josh argues that God allows evil because He has given people a free will to make their own choices — a choice the University professor was not offering his students.

Some have challenged the premise of the movie, claiming it’s over the top in the pressure the professor exerts on students to deny their faith.

Ironically, while the movie was showing in theaters, University of Connecticut anthropology professor James Boster seems to have played out his version of a sequel on a YouTube video posted April 23, 2014.

A group of evangelists were exercising their Freedom of Speech and sharing their faith at the University of Connecticut. We don’t know all that was said, but they certainly did challenge evolution — based on their sign “Evolution is a lie” and Boster’s reaction.

At one point, Boster decides to challenge the evangelists. I wonder if he was aware someone was filming him?

The professor becomes aggressive and is very intimidating. He started yelling at this group of Christians. He is getting in their face — quite literally.

Shaking his finger at one of them, Boster says:

“Bullsh**! Bullsh**! You are full of ignorance and lies. I want you to feel ashamed that you are willing to call something a lie that you have never actually read.”

But perhaps the most telling moment of the video is Boster implements his own version of the “God is dead” declaration. At the end, he turns to the students gathered saying:

“I want you to join me in saying ‘Praise Darwin.”

Which the students actually do and they being to chant “Praise Darwin.”

Of course, the students were free not to join in or were they? Since Boster represented the authority at that school to pass or fail the students — there would be no pressure at all?

If this is how Boster acts out in public, I wonder how he functions in the privacy of his classroom? Does he use similar tactics on students who dare to express their faith in his classes or assignments?

The University of Connecticut released a statement on the professor’s behaviour.

“Everyone has the right to exercise free speech on our campuses. At the same time, we expect our faculty to act in a way that promotes civil discourse and to express themselves respectfully. The use of abusive language and the confrontation posture seen here are inconsistent with UConn’s values.”

In defense of his “Praise Darwin” chant, Boster told WVIT-TV:

“I was trying to engage them as cast members in the drama I was creating.”

It was a fitting description of a “God is not Dead” sequel.

 

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