All posts tagged: Teens

Credit: Natalie Downe/Flickr/Creative Commons

The millennial challenge

We often joke with our daughter about being a “millennial” because she and her generation have a strong sense of entitlement. I realize now we are actually demeaning them and putting them in a shame position that makes it harder for them to move into adulthood. Several nights ago, I saw a young boy running with his teammates during a football practice and he couldn’t keep up. He was embarrassed. It broke my heart to see him caught in the throes of obvious comparison and failure in the eyes of his team mates. I wondered if this was what he wanted to do? Or was he playing football because that is what his parents’ wanted? On our journey through the child and teenage years, my husband and I realized that many times we were living our hopes and unmet dreams through our children. This was a harsh reality for us. It took time to undo the damage in their lives, our son in particular. We had to apologize and say “sorry” more than once. Many …

Photo: jbdodane/Flickr

Impact of divorce on teens

I was reading an article about a young teen, William Cornick, 15, from England who stabbed his teacher to death in front of his classmates in 2014. The incident shocked people across England. William was doing exceptionally well academically. He seemed like a normal, well-adjusted boy. Police found the family to be loving, caring and involved in William’s life. They could find no reason that would explain the murder of a teacher. I had to read several articles before I discovered a single line, buried at the bottom of an article that said his parents had divorced. Is it possible, this one fact hidden in dozens of pages written on this horrific attack was the reason for this violent murder? In a previous article, Studies reveal the negative impact of divorce on children, I looked at the impact of divorce on children from a report written by Rebecca O’Neill in 2001 for England’s Institute for the Study of Civil Society based in London. O’Neill looked at the vast amount of research on the profound impact absent fathers …

Will Marijuana usage make teenage boys shorter?

[by Dean Smith] Researchers at Pakistan’s Pir Mehr Ali Shaw Agriculture University concluded that teenage boys who regularly smoke marijuana could have their growth stunted by as much as four inches. The research team studied select hormones in two groups of boys — 217 who regularly smoked Cannabis and 220 boys who didn’t. Using blood tests, they specifically focused on hormones that affect puberty and growth. They discovered that boys who regularly used Marijuana had higher levels of testosterone and luteinising — both hormones related to puberty. Thought these hormone levels spiked, they noted that this group also had lower levels of growth hormones.

Study shows teens using marijuana regularly 60% less likely to finish school

[by Dean Smith] Researchers from Australia’s University of South Wales have concluded if a person starts smoking marijuana before age 17, they are 60% less likely to finish college than their counterparts who do not use the drug. They were also more likely to drop out of high school. While activists try to paint Cannabis as a safe drug to have it legalized, study, after study, after study, and after study are showing that marijuana is anything but safe. The results of Australian study published in The Lancet Psychiatry showed similar dangerous results. Compared to non users, teens who used Cannabis regularly were:

Smoking Marijuana as a teen can negatively affect intelligence for life: Report

As the perception strengthens that marijuana is a safe drug, there have been a rash of studies suggesting cannibis is anything but safe, particularly for teens as their brains are still developing. Researchers at the US-based National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA) just released a report stating marijuana usage not only effects a teen’s brain function, particularly in the important areas of “critical thinking” and memory, but that the affects are long-lasting. Translated: these effects do not reverse even if the person quits using the drug later in life.