All posts tagged: Roman Catholic Church

How the Catholic Church was infiltrated by communists

Jesus warned that evil would attempt to infiltrate and damage the church from within. He described them as wolves in sheep’s clothing. And in their book, The Devil and Bella Dodd: One Woman’s Struggle Against Communism and Her Redemption, authors Dr. Paul Kengor and Mary Nicholas, MD, described the work of Bella Dodd who was responsible for planting wolves in Catholic seminaries around the world, LifeSite News reports. Bella Dodd (1904 to 1969) was a prominent Communist and full time employeee the New York Teachers Union. She became leader of the Communist Party of America in 1943 and has been described as “one of Communism’s most strident voices” in the US> In the later 1920s, Moscow’s Communist Party sent directives to its operatives around the world commissioning them to plant communists within Roman Catholic seminaries and dioceses with the plan to destroy the church from within. According to the authors, Dodd claimed to have successfully planted 1,200 communists in Catholic seminaries around the world. By the time Dodd was done, four of them had risen …

Roman Catholic Doctrine: the veneration of Mary

The Roman Catholic Church’s veneration of Mary started centuries ago in the church’s battle with Gnosticism, a belief that separated the spirit of a man from his flesh. Flesh was evil, and the spirit was good. As part of this belief, a person could basically sin as much as they wanted in the flesh, because the spirit remained pure, a view hinted at and condemned by Paul in Romans 6:1. The Gnostics also believed that because of the Lord’s sinless life, Jesus could not have been human or born in flesh, and that He appeared on earth in spirit form. As this heresy spread in the early church, Christ’s humanity, became a test for the spirits; 2 This is how you can recognize the Spirit of God: Every spirit that acknowledges that Jesus Christ has come in the flesh is from God, (1 John 4:3 NIV) To counter this heresy, the church began to push and exalt Mary, Jesus’s earthly mother, as evidence of Christ’s human birth. But by the third and fourth century, it had …

Roman Catholic doctrine: Praying to the saints

When it comes to praying to the saints, the Roman Catholic Church knows it is walking a fine line, because of the repeated admonitions throughout the Bible against contacting the dead. Leviticus 20:6 explicitly warns that God will oppose any person who consults mediums (those who consult the dead) or familiar spirits (literally the souls of dead family members). Similar warnings are found in Leviticus 19:31, and Deuteronomy 18:10-11. So how does the Catholic Church get around these warnings? Well, first it states that people are not actually praying to dead saints, they are simply asking these saints to pray for them. Suggesting that asking the dead to pray for you is different from prayer is just a matter of semantics. In fact, they are praying to the saints, even when asking. To support their position of praying to the saints, Catholic theologians point to passages in the Book of Revelation that picture people in heaven praising, worshiping and even petitioning God (Revelation 4:10, 5:8, 6:9-11). They theorize that Mary, the mother of Jesus, can …

Roman Catholic doctrine: What is Purgatory?

The Roman Catholic Church has several beliefs that differ from Protestant doctrine. One of them is purgatory. The American Heritage Dictionary defines purgatory this way: In the belief of Roman Catholics and others, a place of purgation in which the souls of those dying penitent are purified from venial sins, or undergo the temporal punishment which, after the guilt of mortal sin has been remitted, still remains to be endured by the sinner. Catholics believes purgatory is a place where the souls of Christians will go after death in order to pay the penalty for their ‘venial’ sins. Though the punishment can include fire (though some Catholic theologians disagree), it is looked upon more as a purifying process than a punishment, which is what hell involves. Nevertheless, it is a place where people will receive punishment for their sins, and once that punishment has been paid, they will be allowed to enter heaven. The idea of purgatory, which comes from the Latin word purgatorium and means to cleanse, was officially incorporated into Roman Catholic doctrine …

Did the Pope get it wrong? … or right?

Most of the world knows, now, that the Pope of the Roman Catholic Church has just finished a visit to Canada. He is eighty-four years old, and sometimes he was transported in a wheelchair. I live close to some of the sites that he visited, and I know, the weather was hot. Apparently, he is now talking about retirement. So, what would motivate a man in his eighties, to travel to the other side of the world, and speak to huge crowds? The stadium, where he held a mass, holds about sixty thousand, and about fifty thousand attended the mass. The local authorities warned about traffic disruptions on major highways. The motivation was clear; there is a history of church-run boarding schools for native people, and the Pope now describes that as “genocide.” He traveled to Canada to apologize for something that his church did. He believes his church was wrong. Can we judge the Pope? Was he wrong? Or was he correct? Was it important for an old man to travel so far, and …

Video: Why did the Vatican transfer $2.3b to Australia?

This bizarre story alleges that over the last six or so years, the Vatican has transferred $2.3 billion to Australia. According to this report, Australian Bishops have not heard of this money and have no idea what it was for. There are lots of theories including one allegedly involving Bishop George Pell. I have no idea who he is. There may be valid reasons for these transfers, but apparently Australian police are investigating.

Pope Francis Credit: Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston/George Martell/Pilot News Media/Flickr/Creative Commons

Is Pope Francis paving the way for a second exodus from the Catholic church — Reformation Part II?

When Martin Luther, a Catholic seminary professor and priest, pounded his 95 thesis on the door of a Roman Catholic church in Wittenburg Germany on October 31, 1517, he was not setting out to start a new church, he was trying to reform the Catholic church. He was responding to the efforts of Johann Tetzel, a Dominican monk, who arrived in the area selling indulgences to help build a new cathedral in Rome. The indulgences allowed people to buy their way into heaven. Martin Luther said people are saved by faith, not by money. The Roman Catholic church reacted to Luther’s call for reform birthing the protestant church. Now on the 500th anniversary of this reformation is a second one brewing? I have been reading comments on a number of conservative Catholic sites of grave concerns about Pope Francis. Pope Francis who campaigned and won the papacy in 2013 as a conservative Catholic is anything but. Conservative Catholics call Francis a Marxist and a liberal. In 2015, Eugenio Scalfari, publisher of the Italian newspaper La …

Athol Murray College of Notre Dame, Wilcox, Saskatchewan: Google Street View

Christian Heroes 4 – Father Athol Murray

To those who met Athol Murray for the first time, it would have been easy to mistake him for a steelworker or a farmer. He was, instead, a priest, one of the most remarkable Canada has ever known. With the Catholic Church and other churches beset with the scandal that was the residential school system, it is good to remind ourselves that there were some who, given charge of young lives, emboldened and enriched them. It was said that Père Murray had “the mind of a Greek scholar, the vocabulary of a dock worker, and the soul of a saint.” Working with the Sisters of Charity of St. Louis, he established Notre Dame College in Wilcox, Saskatchewan in 1927 as a place where young men and women, Catholic and non-Catholic, could come together for both learning and intensive training in competitive sports. Especially hockey, the priest’s favourite sport. The Notre Dame Hounds hockey team has a storied history, with at least 14 Hounds making it to the NHL. Other alumni included Olympic Gold Medallist Delaney …

Mary and Me

[by Wayne Johnston] Now that Christmas is behind us for this year, I would like to write about Mary, the mother of Jesus. Lots has been written over the years of her great attributes, her holiness and purity of spirit; many songs have been written, paintings painted, and her statues fill churches all over the world, signaling her out as the “highly favoured one” of God (Luke 1:28). Can you imagine how you would feel if God sent Gabriel to you one night to announce that in God’s eyes you are a “highly favoured one”? Would you look for your statues in churches alongside Mary’s?

Paralyzed woman reportedly healed during a church service in Pompeii, Italy

In April 2003, Michelina Comegna, 74, was partially paralyzed after going through treatment for breast cancer. During surgery to remove a lump in her breast, she had an aneurism which left her paralyzed. She went on to have a mastectomy and chemotherapy treatment. On March 23, 2014, during a service at a Catholic church in modern Pompeii, Italy, Comegna was reportedly healed. In an interview with a local newspaper, Gazzetta del Sud Online, Comegna told what happened: