All posts tagged: Healing our rejection

REJECTION

One of the most difficult challenges a person can experience is rejection and in a recent article in The Epoch Times, Dawn Milberger, 55, shared her story. Dawn had been adopted into a Christian family, and it wasn’t until she was 18 that she discovered the full story of what had happened, when she finally tracked down her birth mother. It was then she discovered that her mother, with the aid of a nursing friend, tried to abort Dawn several times in the first seven months of pregnancy, before eventually giving birth. Her mother’s friend provided abortion-inducing drugs that she stole from the office where she worked. After telling the story, her birth mom pleaded for Dawn to forgive her. This was the ultimate form of rejection and for the next several months, Dawn struggled as anger began building in her heart over the rejection. But with the help of her adoptive parents, Dawn worked through her emotions to forgive her mother. “He can’t build on us if we have unforgiveness on us. Unforgiveness cannot …

Nambia desert Credit: John Adams/Flickr/Creative Commons

Healing our rejection

Español: Sanando el rechazo Using a MRI scan university researchers discovered that emotional pain associated with rejection is as real as physical pain. In 2011, the group led by University of Michigan associate professor Ethan Kross studied 40 people who had recently gone through a romantic break-up within the previous six months. All the participants chosen mentioned having felt intense feelings of rejection due to the ending of the relationship. The 40 people were then put through two tests one related to the emotional pain they felt over the rejection and the other actual physical pain. In the first test, the study subjects viewed an image of their ex and were asked to think about the break up.  In the second stage, thermal devices were attached to their arms that created heat the equivalent of hot coffee. As the 40 people went through these and other comparative tests, the researchers monitored their brain activity using MRIs. The researchers found that feelings of rejection sparked neural activity in the same area of the brain where people …