All posts tagged: Generational Curses

Jesus the Name above all names Photo: Jesus on Corcovado

Generational Curses: Part 7 — Breaking the Demonic stronghold

This is the last article in my series on Generational Curses. We have been studying a passage out of Exodus 20:4-5, where God says he will pass the parents’ iniquity on to the children for up to four generations. In this closing article, I will look at the demonic strongholds often connected with generational curses. Iniquity and sin attract demons, like rotting flesh attracts flies. We can see this association in the life of Judas, the man who betrayed Jesus to the High Priest. In Acts 1:18, the apostle Peter declared that the 30 pieces of silver — which Judas received from the High Priest to show Jesus location — was the “reward of iniquity.” But an earlier account provides a clearer depiction of money’s hold on Judas. In this incident, we read the story of Mary anointing Jesus’ feet with a valuable measure of perfume. We know that Judas was the treasurer of Christ’s band of disciples and the disciples were well aware that Judas embezzled money from this fund (John 12:4-6). Judas openly …

Forgiving our parents and forefathers is a necessary step to breaking Generational curses. Photo: Mae Wells/Flickr/Creative Commons

Generational Curses: Part 6 — the one condition, forgiving our parents

In Exodus 20:4-5, the Bible says the iniquity of the parents would be passed on to their children for up to four generations. In the previous posts, we talked about how Jesus’ death on the cross broke this curse Galatians 3: 9-13. But having the curse broken does not guarantee it’s broken. Similarly, just because Jesus died for our sins, does not mean every one is saved and just because by His stripes we are healed, does not mean everyone is automatically healed. We have to contend and believe for salvation and healing and similarly must do the same to break Generational Curses. Though Jesus broke the curse, there is one condition attached for it to happen — forgiveness. In Leviticus 26, God lays out the blessings and punishment that He would place on Israel if they chose to live unrighteously. Initially God would judge them with blight, pestilence and disease hoping this would turn the nation from its iniquity. However, if Israel failed to respond, they would face the ultimate punishment — removal from …

Photo: Rafal Zych/Flickr/Creative Commons

Generational Curses: Part 5 — Exposing the secret sins

In this series we are studying the Biblical concept of Generational Curses that tells how the “iniquity” of the parents can be passed down to the children (Exodus 20:4-5). Children can actually inherit their parent’s sin. In the last article, we started our discussed on how to break with Generational curses. The first step involves understanding that Jesus broke the curse. This means that we are fighting from the higher ground. The curse is broken, we must enforce it. We also looked at the need to deal with the victim mentality that can cause people to quit the fight. In this post, I want to look at the next important step. Coming clean on your iniquity Because of the nature of iniquity, it tends to be our most closely guarded secret. We don’t want anyone to find out about it. Some say that we are only as sick as our deepest secrets. One of the keys to breaking the power of generational curses is confession. Job’s cover-up In Job 31:33, the ancient patriarch confesses that …

Jesus breaks the curse of Generational curses!

Generational Curses: Part 4 — Jesus breaks the curse

In this series we have been studying a Biblical principle found in Scripture often called Generational Curses. First cited in Exodus 20:5 and referenced several times after (Exodus 34:7; Numbers 14:18; Deuteronomy 5:9 and Jeremiah 36:31), it revolves around the idea that the sin/iniquity of the parents can be be passed down to the children for up to four generations. 5 You shall not worship them or serve them; for I, the Lord your God, am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers on the children, on the third and the fourth generations of those who hate Me. (Exodus 20:5 NASV) In our previous article, I discussed how King David’s family was affected by such a curse or sin stronghold. So the obvious question is, what type of iniquity or sin can be passed down? In the Exodus passage, it states that iniquity of the parents can be passed down, not the sin. While sin refers to the act of sinning, iniquity speaks of a sin addiction. Since one of the earliest references to …

Was David's son -- King Solomon -- affected by a generational curse in David's family. Image: Queen of Sheba visiting King Solomon by Edward Poynter (1836-1919)/Wikipedia

Generational Curses: Part 3 — Did King David’s family have a generational curse?

In the first two articles in this series on Generational Curses, I looked at the principles of this curse outlined in Exodus 20:5, where God said the iniquity of the parents would be passed to the children for up to four generations. 5 You shall not worship them or serve them; for I, the Lord your God, am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers on the children, on the third and the fourth generations of those who hate Me. (Exodus 20:5 NASV) In this third article, we will study the devastating effects that generational curses had on one particular family — King David’s. This will involve taking a second look at what is conceivably one of the most misinterpreted verses in the Bible. Israel’s greatest illegitimate son In our first article, we studied how it was the iniquity (Hebrew awon) and not the sin (Hebrew chattah) of the parents that would be passed on to the children. In that article, I discussed that while sin refers to the act, iniquity refers to a …

Passing on iniquity for four generations?

Generational curses: Part 2 — For four generations

Español: Maldiciones generacionales: Parte 2 – Durante cuatro generaciones In my first article on Generational Curses, I looked at a verse in Exodus 20:5, where God promised to visit the iniquity of the parents on the children. 5 You shall not worship them or serve them; for I, the Lord your God, am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers on the children, on the third and the fourth generations of those who hate Me. (Exodus 20:5 NASV) In that article, we discussed how it was the iniquity (Hebrew awon) and not the sin (Hebrew chataah), that was passed on. The difference between the two being that while sin refers to the act, iniquity refers to a sin addiction. In much the same way children inherit red hair and freckles from their parents, they also inherit spiritual characteristics as well. In this article, I want to discuss the third principle noted in this verse that generational curses can pass down for up to four generations. Ironically, in my first post, I cited a story …

Inheriting sin?

Generational Curses: Part 1 — Inheriting sin?

Español: Las maldiciones generacionales: Parte 1 – La herencia de pecado? In her article in the Globe and Mail entitled “The Bad Seed,” Carolyn Abraham tells the story of Dan S. (a pseudonym). In 2003, when she wrote this article, the man was sitting on death row in a state prison in the southern US. The court sentenced him to death for the cold-blooded murder of a pizza store manager in a 1991 robbery. When he entered the pizza store, the 24-year-old manager quickly complied with Dan’s demands and handed over all the money in the till. Then Dan forced the manager to his knees and in a gangland style murder, callously shot the employee point-blank in the back of the head. “You should have seen the fat slob begging for his life,” Dan later gloated. He was on a rampage. Prior to this incident, he had committed a number of armed robberies, plus a string of car and credit-card thefts. After the pizza-store hold-up, he robbed six more restaurants and dry cleaning businesses before …