All posts tagged: 1984

Will America have a ‘Ministry of Truth’?

In his dystopian novel, Nineteen Eighty-Four, that was supposed to be the fictional account of the nation of Oceania, George Orwell refers to the four ministries set up by government to control the masses. Ironically, he noted that these ministries were the polar opposite of what they were intended to represent. In the book, they are described as: The Ministry of Peace concerns itself with war, the Ministry of Truth with lies, the Ministry of Love with torture and the Ministry of Plenty with starvation. These contradictions are not accidental, nor do they result from ordinary hypocrisy: they are deliberate exercises in doublethink. As mentioned, the Ministry of Truth was the exact opposite of what it was named. In reality, its primary purpose was to decide what truth was and then to rewrite history and facts if they did not align with the party’s current determination of truth. Facts were changed as needed. This included promoting statements that 2+2=5, if necessary. Orwell writes: In the end the Party would announce that two and two made …

Cultural Marxism: ‘2 + 2 = 5’

In his novel, 1984, George Orwell used the equation “2 + 2 = 5” to describe the attempt by socialist tyrants to convince people an obvious lie, is true. It was their way of controlling the narrative. And in fact, the Soviet Union even employed an actual poster (see above) when Joseph Stalin implemented his five-year economic plan and later announced it would be completed in four years. It was a tyrant mocking his citizens, because he could. In his book, 1984, Orwell wrote: In the end the Party would announce that two and two made five, and you would have to believe it. It was inevitable that they should make that claim sooner or later: the logic of their position demanded it. Not merely the validity of experience, but the very existence of external reality, was tacitly denied by their philosophy. The heresy of heresies was common sense. And what was terrifying was not that they would kill you for thinking otherwise, but that they might be right. For, after all, how do we …